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The Power of One delivers a clear and specific message that is understood and remembered by children.

Our Message

Report and deal with bullying when you see it

Don't be a Bystander

Bystanders are as guilty as bullies

You can make a difference

 

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Soren Bennick's The Power of One™

In The Press

CTV News Coverage - Power of ONE!




Hartshorn Students Learn About the Power of One

The program focuses on anti-bullying and not being a bystander.

From Millburn-Short Hillls Patch
By Jennifer Connic
March 12, 2010

"What should you do when you see bullying?" "Tell your teacher!"

Students yelled the mantra during Friday's Power of One anti-bullying program at Hartshorn Elementary School. Students were broken into two groups—kindergarten through third grade and fourth and fifth graders—to learn about how they can do their part to stop bullying.

Molly and Andrew from Soren Bennick Production lead the program that unfolded in a series of skits. They each wore colored masks to show the different people who can be involved in bullying. Green was for the bully, purple for the victim and yellow for the bystander, who can laugh at or ignore bullying.

For the younger grades they showed verbal and physical bullying, and the older students also learned about cyberbullying and texting. In one skit, a girl invited the whole school to her birthday party except John because he is "a loser." And she calls him a crybaby on the bus ride home when he cries from her taunting.

They told the students they need to step in when they see their friends in trouble because of bullying and stop being a bystander. Don't think of it being a tattle tale so much as helping someone who is in trouble. "You didn't cause (the bullying) to happen," they told the students.

The power of one, they were told, is the power inside each person to help victims of bullying. Everyone has the power inside, students were told, and they should tell a teacher or another trusted adult.

Hartshorn Principal Ron Castaldo said bullying is very real and asked students to help their friends. They should tell a teacher or another adult, like him, and he promised to the students he would make the bullying stop.

Students in all of Millburn-Short Hills' elementary schools have had the Power of One program this school year.



Harker News Online


Welland Tribune


Calgary Board of Education


Mukilteo Tribune

Mukilteo

Mukilteo students learn about preventing bullying

Mukilteo Tribune, Thursday, November 6, 2008

Mukilteo Elementary School students learned how to identify bullying and what to do if they witness or are a victim of bullying from two bubbly actresses during the interactive production, “The Power of One.”

The show, “The Power of One,” teaches students the different types of bullying, that bystanders are just as guilty as the bully and gave students the chance to sign an oath promising they wouldn’t bully their peers.

The “Power of One” is a series of skits performed by actors from Soren Bennick Productions, based out of Canada. The traveling actors visit elementary schools across North America and Australia using visuals like pompoms, a superhero costume, colored boxes and masks to teach students how to protect themselves and others from bullying.

The highlight of the show is when the actresses asked a student from the audience to look into a white box with a mirror inside to find the solution to stop bullying.

The actresses, Maryanne and Kate, asked a girl from the audience to strike her best superhero pose and adorned her in silver goggles, a white cape and Batman gloves.

“What do you see,” they asked her.

“Myself,” she said.

The actresses emphasized to students the main component to end bullying is the individual, hence where the title of the show comes from.

“What is bullying,” Kate asked the students.

“Pulling someone’s ear,” one girl said.

“Giving them a wedgie,” one boy said.

“That’s definitely being a bully,” Kate said.

When asked by show of hands who had been bullied, the majority of the students and their teachers raised their hands.

Maryanne said bullying causes fear and humiliation.

“Bullying happens to almost everyone,” Maryanne said to the students.

During skits showing physical, verbal and exclusion bullying, the bully wasidentified with a green mask and the target with a purple mask.

“What should I do,” the target would ask the students.

“Tell your teacher,” the students shouted back.

Maryanne and Kate introduced the third role in bullying, the bystander.

“The bystander is usually around when bullying happens,” Kate said. “They look away or cheer the bullying on.”

Four students volunteered to play bystanders during one of the skits while two others played the bully and the target.

One boy waved a green and yellow pompom cheering on the fight, one girl had a giant hat over her eyes and another boy and girl were preoccupied by their popcorn and giant binoculars.

When the students performed the scene a second time, the bystanders told the bully to knock it off and got one of their teachers from the audience.
Maryanne said reporting bullying is a lot different than tattling.

“When you report bullying you get someone out of trouble,” Maryanne said.


Lakehead Public School

The Power of One

On Tuesday, February 12th, Edgewater Park Public School students will have the “power”. Soren Bennick Productions were at Edgewater Park to present The Power of One, an anti-bullying show that focuses on helping students identify types of bullying. The Power of One is a series of skits presented by actors who use boxes, colours, and masks to vividly portray what bullying is, what can be done about it, and how every child has the power of one, the power to report bullying when they see it.

The Power of One:

  • Explains the roles in bullying: Bully, Target, and Bystander
  • Shows vivid examples of different types of bullying: Physical, Verbal, Exclusion, and Cyber bullying
  • Alerts children that Targets need help and intervention
  • Encourages students not to be bystanders
  • Emphasizes the need for individual action to make the community a safer, better place
  • Refers children to parents, adults, and teachers for further assistance and instruction

At the end of the performance, the school was presented with a 2’ by 4’ poster with an Anti-bullying Oath which will be signed by all students and put up in the school.


Sammamish Review.com

‘Power of One’ teaches students
they can stop harassment

October 28, 2008
By Chantelle Lusebrink


Cameron Cho (left to right) participate at
Challenger Elementary School in the assembly
to teach an end to bullying. Photo By Robin Earl.

Bullies have no place in school, especially at Challenger Elementary School, where the entire student body signed a contract to prevent bullying Oct. 21. But before signing the contract, the students gathered for assemblies hosted by Soren Bennick Productions, a company from Toronto, Canada, which taught them about the dangers of bullying and how they can stop it with the “Power of One.”

“Each and every one of you have the power to stop bullying with the ‘Power of One,’” said Marianne Mandrusiak, one of two speakers with the company.

The assembly was held to address one of the school’s nine life skills officials cover with students throughout the year, according to school counselor Pam Ridenour.

October was learning the skill of cooperation — learning to work and play with others. 

Two actresses from the company, Mandrusiak and Kate McKnight, performed three short acts for students about different types of bullying — physical and verbal — to help students understand what bullying looks like and how sad it makes people feel. 

“I learned that if you are bullied and you hit someone else back, you are being a bully, too,” said kindergartner Kushagra Verma. 

Students didn’t just learn about bullies and victims. They also learned about how being a witness to bullying and doing nothing about it is wrong, too.

Throughout the assembly, students were able to use their ‘Power of One’ to stop the bullies by telling them to stop, by ignoring them or by telling a teacher.

“I hope everyone understands the ‘Power of One,’” Principal Robin Earl said. “I want you to take your power and make a difference. I want you to support your friends, not only at school, but in your neighborhoods, too.”

“I learned that I am strong,” said kindergartner Hanna Meyer, who was outfitted like a superhero by Mandrusiak and McKnight to help students find the “Power of One” and help stop bullying. 

Hanna said that if she were to see bullying at school, she’d tell the bully to stop, but so far, she hasn’t seen any.


Issaquah Press.com

Learning the ‘Power of One’ can help stop harassment

October 28, 2008
By Chantelle Lusebrink


Marianne Mandrusiak (left) and Kate McKnight,
actors with ‘Power of One,’ dress Challenger student
Hanna Meyer as a superhero during the assembly to
teach an end to bullying. By Chantelle Lusebrin

Bullies have no place in school, especially at Challenger Elementary School, where the entire student body signed a contract to prevent bullying Oct. 21.

But before signing the contract, the students gathered for an assembly hosted by Soren Bennick Productions, a company from Toronto, Canada, which taught them about the dangers of bullying and how they can stop it with the “Power of One.”

“Each and every one of you have the power to stop bullying with the ‘Power of One,’” said Marianne Mandrusiak, one of two speakers with the company.

The assembly was held to address one of the school’s nine life skills officials cover with students throughout the year, according to school counselor Pam Ridenour.

October was learning the skill of cooperation — learning to work and play with others. 

Two actresses from the company, Mandrusiak and Kate McKnight, performed three short acts for students about different types of bullying — physical and verbal — to help students understand what bullying looks like and how sad it makes people feel. 

“I learned that if you are bullied and you hit someone else back, you are being a bully, too,” said kindergartner Kushagra Verma. 

Students didn’t just learn about bullies and victims. They also learned about how being a witness to bullying and doing nothing about it is wrong, too.

Throughout the assembly, students were able to use their ‘Power of One’ to stop the bullies by telling them to stop, by ignoring them or by telling a teacher.

“I hope everyone understands the ‘Power of One,’” Principal Robin Earl said. “I want you to take your power and make a difference. I want you to support your friends, not only at school, but in your neighborhoods, too.”

“I learned that I am strong,” said kindergartner Hanna Meyer, who was outfitted like a superhero by Mandrusiak and McKnight to help students find the “Power of One” and help stop bullying. 

Hanna said that if she were to see bullying at school, she’d tell the bully to stop, but so far, she hasn’t seen any.

Reach Reporter Chantelle Lusebrink at 392-6434, ext. 241, or clusebrink@isspress.com.

Bullying

Signs your student could be a victim:

Withdrawn behavior

Physical symptoms, such as stomachaches, headaches or anxiety

Lack of desire to attend certain activities, classes or school

What to do: 

Encourage your child to become friends with other children.

Write down and report all bullying.

Encourage your child to develop new skills and interpersonal skills through activities, like sports, clubs or music.

Help your child acquire verbal and physical skills to deal with a bully and practice them at home.

Encourage your child to tell his or her bully to stop his or her behavior in an authoritative, nonjoking manner.

If your child is a bystander, encourage him or her to help without getting hurt or report it to an adult.

Signs your child could be a bully:

Aggressive behavior 

Low self-esteem

Uses his or her physical power to obtain something from another child

Talks about eliminating certain friends from his or her group without good cause

Uses derogatory slurs in everyday language

What to do:

  • Reinforce school rules about bullying at home by setting firm rules about aggressive behavior.
  • Take it seriously.
  • Help your child develop skills and interests that don’t promote bullying behaviors. 
  • Be a role model by not gossiping or exhibiting excessively aggressive behaviors.
  • Help your child understand how his or her actions hurt others.

Sources: State Attorney General’s Office, Issaquah School District

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